Home
NEW TODAY
SCRIPT CONTESTS
FREE EVENTS
WATCH MOVIES
NEW MOVIES
FESTIVAL VIDEOS
PICTURES
READ POETRY
MOVIE SCENES
SUBMIT your FILM
POETRY CONTEST
DAILY PODCASTS
WATCH FREE FILMS
THE LAST RITE
2010 MOVIES
ACTORS
ACTRESSES
DIRECTORS
MOVIES by YEAR
FILM FRANCHISES
MOVIE GENRES
NOTES and IDEAS
WATCH VIRAL
GET OUR E-ZINE!
CONTACT US
TOP 100 Sex
FAQ
2011 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

VARSITY BLUES, 1999
Movie Review

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
TOP 100TOP 100 LISTS WEBSITE
Best of photos, movies, sex and everything else!
movie trailersMOVIE TRAILERS
SEE the UPCOMING films. Plus reviews!
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!

WATCH today's TOP SHORT FILMS
EXPLORE and WATCH the TOP PAGES on THE NET!!
wildcardWATCH the best of WILDCARD PICTURES!
wildcardWATCH - BEAUTIFUL short film!
wildcardWATCH - NOSTALGIA short film!
wildcardWATCH - EMBEDDED short film!
wildcardWATCH - YARDSALE short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE AUDITION short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE ADDICT short film!
wildcardWATCH - 48 short film!
wildcardWATCH - DIM SUM OF ITS PARTS short film!
wildcardWATCH - START TO FINISH classic 8min. short film!
wildcardWATCH - MAILROOM 1min. short film!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIE PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of film!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 SEX PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of sex pages online!
NAKED SCENESWATCH the TOP 100 SEX VIDEOS on the NET!
SEE the best of sex online!!
WATCH MOVIESWATCH Today's MOVIES
Best of NEW films on the NET!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIES of ALL-TIME
See the best of film!
DIRECTORTOP 100 DIRECTORS of ALL-TIME
SEE THE LIST. Reviews, Photos and Scenes!
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCRIPTS
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!

VARSITY BLUES MOVIE POSTER
VARSITY BLUES, 1999
Movie Reviews

Directed by Brian Robbins
Starring: James Van Der Beek, Amy Smart, Jon Voight, Paul Walker, Ron Lester, Scott Caan, Ari Larter
Review by Brent Randall



SYNOPSIS:

The inner workings of a traditional high school football powerhouse are explored, and the trials and tribulations the players face are exposed.

CLICK HERE and watch 2009 MOVIES FOR FREE!

REVIEW:

With an array of stars including James Van Der Beek, Jon Voight, Amy Smart, Ali Larter, Scott Caan, and Paul Walker, Varsity Blues dives deep into the variables that drive an American phenomenon known as high school football. Set in a small Texas town called West Canaan, the story is centered around Jonathon Moxon (James Van Der Beek) as he struggles with finishing his senior season as a backup quarterback. While a great player in his own right, he is not as good as the Florida State bound Lance Harbor (Paul Walker) who is the starting quarterback and brother of his girlfriend Jules Harbor (Amy Smart). The movie opens at the halfway point of the season with a scene of the five main players and great friends, Moxon, Harbor, Charlie Tweeder (Scott Caan), Billy Bob (Ron Lester), Wendell Brown (Eliel Swinton), riding to school for the morning pep rally. We learn quickly that these guys really care about each other, and want to win for each other than, more than they want to win for their coach or the town that lives and breathes through them.

As the guys arrive to school at the pep rally, we get our first glimpse of Coach Bud Kilmer (Jon Voight). Kilmer is the coach who put West Canaan on the map and is respected and feared by everyone in the town except for the players who play for him. Kilmer is an overbearing, championship obsessed, coach who is riding the coat tails of his latest great player, Lance Harbor. At the pep rally, through Kilmer's speech, one can read between the lines and quickly discover Kilmer cares about one thing and only one thing, winning. We also learn from this pep rally, based on all the people attending, that this town also cares about one and one thing only, and that is winning football games on Friday nights!

The town, it's past, present, and future, revolves around the West Canaan Coyotes winning games. The only ones that seem to see a world beyond West Canaan are the five players the story revolves around, especially Moxon. This point is made very apparent during the first game sequence when Moxon is sitting on the bench reading a book hidden inside his playbook. Moxon knows his future lies at Brown University, and that as long as Lance is healthy, he'll never see one down under Kilmer's watch. It is grossly apparent Kilmer fears Moxon and wants to

ensure Moxon will not undermine the 35 years he has put into West Canaan. After the first game, this becomes even more obvious when the players are walking back to the tunnel. Kilmer walks over to Moxon, rips the playbook from Moxon's hands, opens it, grabs the novel and tosses it under the bleachers. He tells Moxon he would cut him from the team but since Moxon's dad played his heart out for him, he feels obligated to keep Moxon around. This scene is a pivotal moment in the film because we see how stagnant this town really is, that no one ever moves on past high school, that generations upon generations are willing to overlook Kilmer's destructive tactics because he brings championships, and in a town where football is above the law, that is really all that matters. Most importantly though, we learn that Moxon is not afraid to stand up to Kilmer and the town that follows him. He is willing to sacrafice himself to open the entire town's eyes to the oppression they fail to see they are suffering from.

During the next game, late in the fourth quarter, Lance severly injures his knee. Apparently, he had been suffering from previous knee damage that Kilmer simply overlooked because he needed Lance at quarterback, and this hit was the final blow. Lance is carried off on a stretcher and Moxon is thrust into duty. Although Kilmer does not care for Moxon, he has no choice if he wants to satisfy his lust for winning. We quickly see though, Moxon refuses to conform to Kilmer's rules when he calls his own plays to win the game.

As the season progresses, Moxon continues to find ways to win and defy Kilmer in the same breath. The rift between Kilmer and Moxon continues to widen. Moxon, as a quarterback, experiences great success much to the shagrin of Kilmer. However, Kilmer is in a bind, and knows his next region title lies in the hands of Jonathon Moxon. Moxon's success carries over off the field as well when Darcy Sears (Ali Larter), Lance's girlfriend, makes a pass at Moxon. She was riding Lance's ticket to Florida State, and with that out the window, Lance is no good to her anymore. Her plight to get out of West Canaan just futher illustrates the haze this town is fallen under. Moxon being the good guy he is, refuses Darcy, and assures her that she can get out on her own merit.

Moxon is set on proving to himself, his parents, and the entire town there is more to life than football. As the season nears the end, Kilmer threatens to change Moxon's transcripts and ruin his full academic scholarship to Brown if Moxon does not conform to Kimer's ways. This is the point where Moxon must decide between doing the right thing or conforming as everyone else has done in the past.

Varsity Blues is a classic struggle between good vs. evil with Moxon representing all that is good and Kilmer encompassing everything evil. Moxon is constantly forced to make tough decisions and stand up for his beliefs against all odds. As a viewer, I find myself feeling the anxiety, anguish, and fear Moxon feels as he makes these decisions. Having played football at a high school powerhouse and coached high school football in a town similar to West Canaan, I have seen how a town can become fully engulfed into this situation, and I can feel the pressure that is placed upon Moxon and these other players.

Varsity Blues does an excellent job of illustrating the good and bad found in high school football. The excitement and energy is captured as well as the pressure and pitfalls. Yes at times, this movie is a little overdramatic, but it uses this drama to drive their point home. For example, a coach could not really change transcripts. However, a coach could curtail playing time, fail to send tapes to colleges, and bad mouth a player to college coaches. Varsity Blues does a wonderful job of illustrating this point when Kilmer refuses to allow Wendell, a black running back, to score touchdowns or send his tapes to colleges simply because he is black. Varsity Blues makes you question your own inner morals and think about how you would react in these tough situations. The question between doing what is right and what is popular is always a struggle for everyone, and in a society where sometimes being politcally correct is more important than doing the right thing, this question becomes even more difficult to answer. Varsity Blues, beyond its great football action, good acting, and stellar cast, it shows us that heroes come in all shapes and sizes, and that as long as we continue to hope, we always stand a chance of accomplishing greatness.

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
MOVIE KILLSEE 1000s of PICTURES
Best of photos, images and pics
MOVIE YEARMOVIES YEAR BY YEAR
Pages from 1900 to present


Varsity Blues


footer for Varsity Blues page