HOME PAGE
Movie Videos
Films by Year
Films by Director
Films by Actor
Films by Actress
Films by Alphabet
Film Characters
Film Franchises

TOP 100 MOVIES in 2005!


2013 MOVIES
2012 MOVIES
2011 MOVIES
2010 MOVIES
2009 MOVIES
2008 MOVIES
2007 MOVIES
2006 MOVIES
2005 MOVIES
2004 MOVIES
2003 MOVIES
2002 MOVIES
2001 MOVIES
2000 MOVIES
1999 MOVIES
1998 MOVIES
1997 MOVIES
1996 MOVIES
1995 MOVIES
1994 MOVIES
1993 MOVIES
1992 MOVIES
1991 MOVIES
1990 MOVIES
1989 MOVIES
1988 MOVIES
1987 MOVIES
1986 MOVIES
1985 MOVIES
1984 MOVIES
1983 MOVIES
1982 MOVIES
1981 MOVIES
1980 MOVIES
1979 MOVIES
1978 MOVIES
1977 MOVIES
1976 MOVIES
1975 MOVIES
1974 MOVIES
1973 MOVIES
1972 MOVIES
1971 MOVIES
1970 MOVIES
1969 MOVIES
1968 MOVIES
1967 MOVIES
1966 MOVIES
1965 MOVIES
1964 MOVIES
1963 MOVIES
1962 MOVIES
1961 MOVIES
1960 MOVIES
1959 MOVIES
1958 MOVIES
1957 MOVIES
1956 MOVIES
1955 MOVIES
1954 MOVIES
1953 MOVIES
1952 MOVIES
1951 MOVIES
1950 MOVIES
1949 MOVIES
1948 MOVIES
1947 MOVIES
1946 MOVIES
1945 MOVIES
1944 MOVIES
1943 MOVIES
1942 MOVIES
1941 MOVIES
1940 MOVIES
1939 MOVIES
1938 MOVIES
1937 MOVIES
1936 MOVIES
1935 MOVIES
1934 MOVIES
1933 MOVIES
1932 MOVIES
1931 MOVIES
1930 MOVIES
1929 MOVIES
1928 MOVIES
1927 MOVIES
1926 MOVIES
1925 MOVIES
1924 MOVIES
1923 MOVIES
1922 MOVIES
1921 MOVIES
1920 MOVIES
1919 MOVIES
1918 MOVIES
1917 MOVIES
1916 MOVIES
1915 MOVIES
1914 MOVIES
1913 MOVIES
1912 MOVIES
1911 MOVIES
1910 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

TIDELAND, 2005
Movie Reviews!

Search 1,000 of MOVIES
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
2005 MOVIE BESTTOP 100 MOVIES from 2005


See the LIST
TOP 100TOP 100 LISTS WEBSITE
Best of photos, movies, sex and everything else!
2013 MOVIES2013 MOVIES
See all of 2013 films!
 MOVIES YEAR BY YEAR

See and watch films 1900 to present!
WATCH VIDEO MOVIE REVIEW:

TIDELAND MOVIETIDELAND, 2005
Movie Reviews

Directed by Terry Gilliam

Starring: Jodelle Ferland, Brendan Fletcher, Janet McTeer, Jeff Bridges, Jennifer Tilly
Review by Mark Engberg


SYNOPSIS:

A little girl endures the hellish consequences of her family life by imagining happiness and fantasy in the rural prairies of her dead grandmother’s cabin.

CLICK HERE and watch TV SHOWS FOR FREE!

Take a look at what's new today!

REVIEW:

“Hello, I’m Terry Gilliam, and I have a confession to make,” the director says into the camera on a black-and-white introduction. “Many of you are not going to like this film. Many of you, luckily, are going to love it. And then, there are many of you who will not know what to think when the film finishes. But hopefully, you’ll be thinking.”

Not a surprising move from the writer/director, notorious for publicly feuding with studios in order to release his own extended versions and receive final cut on his projects. Feeling the need to explain the story’s premise, he goes on to announce that “Tideland” is a child’s perception of the world, and asks the audience for some adjustments in critical judgment.

“Try to rediscover what it was like to be a child with a sense of wonder and innocence,” he continues. “And don’t forget to laugh.”

When a visionary director like Gilliam gives you a pre-game personal warning like that, you can only wonder what disturbing issues lurk in the plotline. And in ways I never thought capable, they are presented in pure daylight in this movie with somehow innocent conviction.

Based on the book by Mitch Cullin, “Tideland” is essentially a coming-of-age story featuring a little girl who is stripped of her irresponsible parents. Death. Drug addiction. Child abuse. Young Jeliza-Rose is exposed to the darkest shadows that can exist within a household. Her only set of friends is a small collection of Barbie doll heads that she animates with her fingertips. Like Danny in “The Shining”, Jeliza-Rose provides the voices for her pretend friends as she twitches her fingers with convincing characterizations.

When the loud and verbally abusive mother (Jennifer Tilly, who else?) dies from a drug-induced heart attack in the bedroom, her father Noah (a heroin-addled Jeff Bridges, picture The Big Lebowski but without the sense of humor) panics and escapes to his mother’s cabin in the desolate countryside of What Rocks, Texas (even though Gilliam’s production was set in Canada).

It is in these exterior shots where cinematographer Nicola Pecorini achieves the film’s finest glories. Though there are several interior scenes that make excellent use of light and set design, Jeliza-Rose’s playground of grain fields and twisted trees is sensationally captured by Pecorini’s expert camerawork. With visual background art like these landscapes, it is understandable how this little girl can escape the horrors of the real world so she can relinquish in the much more entertaining realm of her imagination.

Like in “Time Bandits”, many of the cameras are set low to the ground and pointed at crooked angles in order to gain a childlike point-of-view. As Noah buries a heroin needle into his arm, the camera slopes lopsided like a child’s confused and tilted head. Noah’s expression turns to a stone-dead gaze that evaporates any sense of life within his body. His skin becomes pale, his stomach grows bloated, and an audible buzz of houseflies begins to pollute the air around his motionless body.

But interestingly, Jeliza-Rose is in total denial of Noah’s apparent overdose. Though she recognized her mother’s death immediately with mild emotion, she fails to process the tragedy of her father with any semblance or responsibility. To her, it’s part of a game. While Noah’s body rots away in a living room rocking chair, she decorates his corpse with wigs and make-up. And it isn’t long before the squirrels start talking to her.

Her imagination becomes even more disturbing as the voices of her make-believe friends sound less like innovative conversationalists and more like signs of deviant schizophrenia. The voices of her doll heads begin making decisions for her and noticing rabbit holes in the ground, evoking the motif of “Alice in Wonderland”. Like Alice, this girl is fumbling through an abyss of immortal depth, the bottom of which may break her sanity. But while the aspect of a child playing gleefully in the company of her decomposing father may rattle the comfort zones of many conservative audience members, it is nothing compared to what follows next.

Jeliza-Rose soon comes into contact with a dark and mysterious woman named Dell (Janet McTeer), who lives in the abandoned prairie field with her mentally challenged brother Dickens (Brendan Fletcher). Skilled in the science of taxidermy, Dell preserves Noah’s corpse with disinfectant and formaldehyde, making the little girl’s former father a respectable living room fixture. The likeliness of Jeff Bridge’s dead face with its stitched eyelets and leathered skin is indeed a gruesome and uncomfortable sight. In this way, the movie resembles “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” more than “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”.

And because she is approaching puberty, the voices inside Jeliza-Rose’s mind start whispering interests regarding amorous feelings and sex. Whether it is because of his mental simplicity reflecting innocence or the fact that he is the only living male figure in her life, Jeliza-Rose chooses Dickens as a likely suitor and becomes a flirtatious girlfriend. This is the part of the story that will make most viewers cringe in their chairs and pinch their arm flesh. More than likely, it is this plot development that caused Terry Gilliam to explain the narrative format in the film’s introduction.

While the director begs the audience to suspend their preconceived notions of child behavior and interaction, this is difficult to do when we are forced with the visual image of a prepubescent child caressing and snuggling a grown man who has a mental handicap. It is an innocent relationship to her, but you are forced to ask if it is a completely harmless affair to the unstable Dickens. The premise is creative and certainly provocative, but also somewhat demented in its graphic depiction of childish passion.

I didn’t hate this movie, Mr. Gilliam, but I can’t say that I loved it either. Like Cullin’s novel, this movie is bold, daring, and independent. Since those qualities reflect a work that is highly controversial, it is safe to say that Mr. Gilliam’s “Tideland” succeeding in making me think. It made me wonder when childhood fantasies cease to be innocent and begin to become signs of madness. It made me speculate about what can happen to unsupervised youth in this violent world of disease, drugs, and death.

Though Gilliam’s ninth solo-directed featured was awarded the FIPRESCI Prize at Spain’s 2005 San Sebastian Festival, the movie was largely neglected by American distributors since it was shelved for almost an entire year after its initial release in Russia in February 2006. When it finally did reach American projectors, “Tideland” only made it to a select handful of theaters and art museums before crossing into the DVD market. In typical tradition for the writer/director, Gilliam openly criticized the US distribution company, ThinkFilm, for mishandling his film’s theatrical release and tampering with the movie’s aspect ratio. Both Gilliam and spokespeople for ThinkFilm have claimed that they are working on the film’s ratio problem so that a theatrical version can be properly presented in DVD format. But if you are like many moviegoers who find the graphic elements of independent cinema distasteful, you will discover that a ratio problem is the least of this movie’s problems.

TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIE PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of film!
SEXY PHOTOSSEXY PHOTOS TOP 100
Sexiest people on the planet!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 SEX PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of sex pages online
NAKED SCENESWATCH the TOP 100 NUDE SCENES of all-time
SEE the best of naked film!


TIDELAND


footer for TIDELAND page