HOME PAGE
Movie Videos
Films by Year
Films by Director
Films by Actor
Films by Actress
Films by Alphabet
Film Characters
Film Franchises

TOP 100 MOVIES in 2006!


2013 MOVIES
2012 MOVIES
2011 MOVIES
2010 MOVIES
2009 MOVIES
2008 MOVIES
2007 MOVIES
2006 MOVIES
2005 MOVIES
2004 MOVIES
2003 MOVIES
2002 MOVIES
2001 MOVIES
2000 MOVIES
1999 MOVIES
1998 MOVIES
1997 MOVIES
1996 MOVIES
1995 MOVIES
1994 MOVIES
1993 MOVIES
1992 MOVIES
1991 MOVIES
1990 MOVIES
1989 MOVIES
1988 MOVIES
1987 MOVIES
1986 MOVIES
1985 MOVIES
1984 MOVIES
1983 MOVIES
1982 MOVIES
1981 MOVIES
1980 MOVIES
1979 MOVIES
1978 MOVIES
1977 MOVIES
1976 MOVIES
1975 MOVIES
1974 MOVIES
1973 MOVIES
1972 MOVIES
1971 MOVIES
1970 MOVIES
1969 MOVIES
1968 MOVIES
1967 MOVIES
1966 MOVIES
1965 MOVIES
1964 MOVIES
1963 MOVIES
1962 MOVIES
1961 MOVIES
1960 MOVIES
1959 MOVIES
1958 MOVIES
1957 MOVIES
1956 MOVIES
1955 MOVIES
1954 MOVIES
1953 MOVIES
1952 MOVIES
1951 MOVIES
1950 MOVIES
1949 MOVIES
1948 MOVIES
1947 MOVIES
1946 MOVIES
1945 MOVIES
1944 MOVIES
1943 MOVIES
1942 MOVIES
1941 MOVIES
1940 MOVIES
1939 MOVIES
1938 MOVIES
1937 MOVIES
1936 MOVIES
1935 MOVIES
1934 MOVIES
1933 MOVIES
1932 MOVIES
1931 MOVIES
1930 MOVIES
1929 MOVIES
1928 MOVIES
1927 MOVIES
1926 MOVIES
1925 MOVIES
1924 MOVIES
1923 MOVIES
1922 MOVIES
1921 MOVIES
1920 MOVIES
1919 MOVIES
1918 MOVIES
1917 MOVIES
1916 MOVIES
1915 MOVIES
1914 MOVIES
1913 MOVIES
1912 MOVIES
1911 MOVIES
1910 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

THE TRIPPER, 2006
Movie Reviews!

Search 1,000 of MOVIES
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!
WATCH VIDEO MOVIE REVIEW:
2006 MOVIE BESTTOP 100 MOVIES from 2006


See the LIST
2006 MOVIE BEST2006 MOVIE BEST

See over 300 genres of films of 2006

 MOVIES by ALPHABET

See over 10,000 plus films!
 Every movie from 2006

See over 200 plus films!

THE TRIPPER MOVIE POSTER
THE TRIPPER, 2006
Movie Reviews

Directed by David Arquette
Starring: Jaime King, Lukas Haas, Thomas Jane, Jason Mewes and Courteney Cox
Review by Ben Lupinetti



SYNOPSIS:

Six friends attend a Woodstock-type music festival deep in the woods of the Pacific Northwest for a weekend of drugs and fun. Unfortunately, they find themselves in the midst of a serial killer who is obsessed with Ronald Reagan, and is hell bent on ridding the forest of hippies in the most effective way possible: with a big, sharp axe.

CLICK HERE and watch 2009 MOVIES FOR FREE!

REVIEW:

It must be said, first and foremost, that The Tripper was a much, much better movie than it should have been. Movies of this stripe, that is, horror/comedies, tend to fall far short oftheir true potential. The funny/scary combination is one that time and again proves just how tricky it can be to serve up genuinely thrilling scares as well as genuinely funny jokes, and it’s no surprise that most filmmakers who attempt this sub-genre usually fall short on one or both of the two. That’s why The Tripper is such a pleasant surprise.

That’s not to say it succeeds completely, but it is far more advanced than most of the other films of its type. Still though, it is not without its faults, and I am honor bound to now point out those faults that I might make myself feel important.

The story follows a group of carefree twenty-something’s who love drugs like some people love their parents, who set out into the woods of Northern California for the fictional American Free Love Festival, a weekend of indulgence in drugs, alcohol and awhole hell of a lot more drugs, hosted by Paul Reubens as a hippie who just a bit too preoccupied with making money on the event to qualify as truly “groovy” or even “hip.”

Our heroes are all set to have a good time, with the possible exception of Samantha (Jaime King), who recently experienced a bad trip after being accosted by her neoconservative ex-boyfriend while tripping on acid. She is thus in a highly fragile state, but fortunately has the support of her new, much gentler friends. Mercifully, director David Arquette (and here you thought he had disappeared completely) opted to cast the group with good actors—again, something that is hard to come by in this genre—whose lively performances, most notably Jason Mewes’ as Joey, help to prop up the film. Rounding out the cast is Thomas Jane as Sheriff “Buzz” Hall, who exhibits his comedic acting abilities, which he no doubt honed on the set of The Punisher. Buzz seems to be the only one in the forest at all concerned that something might go amiss in three days of peopledrinking more alcohol and doing more drugs than is by any measure reasonable. Things take a turn for the ominous when one of the revelers turns up dead, leading Buzz to suspect a local resident who, as a child was institutionalized for brutally murdering a hippie, and, during his incarceration, found time to build up a major grudge against all hippies and develop an unhealthy obsession with Ronald Reagan. Unfortunately, Buzz’sworries are drowned out by the sounds of people’s being amazed by stuff.

Enter the killer, a man dressed up as Ronald Reagan who evidently has an axe to grind, as a well as a literal, metal axe which proves just sharp enough to cut hippies in half. And sobegins one of the better homicidal rampages in recent memory, which benefits greatly from having hippies at the getting-chopped-into-little-pieces end of things. Fortunately, this yields some pretty good scares, and honestly, is there anything more frightening than a republican with an axe? Unfortunately, as entertaining as it is to watch Ronald Reagan finally strike out at his mortal enemies, the filmmakers don’t get much mileage out of it.

Aside from the killer’s occasionally soliloquizing with a Reagan quote or lamenting youths’ being corrupted by drugs to his dog “Nancy” (how great is that?), it’s more or less a standard slasher film in which people are more or less eviscerated willy-nilly and only the chaste survive. And that’s OK for this film, it’s just not the kind of inventiveness I would expect from people who were creative enough to turn Ronald Reagan into an axe murderer.

One also have to wonder what he’s been doing up until this point. Perhaps practicing his killing techniques on the more left-wing deer and squirrels he finds in the forest? Butsetting aside such missteps the steady-handed directing and entertaining performances make for a unique and enjoyable viewing experience. Sweetening the proverbial pot (no, not that kind of pot), is a killer score with a clear acid rock tinge that meshes nicely with the unconventionally choppy editing and visual effects. There’s even a nice moment where Lukas Haas’ plays a song on guitar for Jaime King, and amazingly, not only does the song not suck, it’s actually pretty good and extremely sweet, though some viewers might find it leaves a saccharine taste in their…ears.

Finally, the important thing to take away from this review (yes, I remembered to include something important this time) is that The Tripper succeeds in an area where you will always find mediocrity in a film like this: the script. It’s more or less a formulaic movie, but it’s done well enough to forgive that. The writing is polished enough that we don’t experience jokes that fall flat or awkward moments that weren’t supposed to awkward,and that’s really, REALLY important, because it’s those small moments that can sink an otherwise decent film. Not giving the actors real drugs helps too.

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
MOVIE KILLSEE 1000s of PICTURES
Best of photos, images and pics
MOVIE YEARMOVIES YEAR BY YEAR
Pages from 1900 to present


The Tripper


footer for The Tripper page