Home
NEW TODAY
SCRIPT CONTESTS
FREE EVENTS
WATCH MOVIES
NEW MOVIES
FESTIVAL VIDEOS
PICTURES
READ POETRY
MOVIE SCENES
SUBMIT your FILM
POETRY CONTEST
DAILY PODCASTS
WATCH FREE FILMS
THE LAST RITE
2010 MOVIES
ACTORS
ACTRESSES
DIRECTORS
MOVIES by YEAR
FILM FRANCHISES
MOVIE GENRES
NOTES and IDEAS
WATCH VIRAL
GET OUR E-ZINE!
CONTACT US
TOP 100 Sex
FAQ
2011 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

THE GODFATHER PART III, 1990
Movie Review

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
TOP 100TOP 100 LISTS WEBSITE
Best of photos, movies, sex and everything else!
movie trailersMOVIE TRAILERS
SEE the UPCOMING films. Plus reviews!
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!

WATCH today's TOP SHORT FILMS
EXPLORE and WATCH the TOP PAGES on THE NET!!
wildcardWATCH the best of WILDCARD PICTURES!
wildcardWATCH - BEAUTIFUL short film!
wildcardWATCH - NOSTALGIA short film!
wildcardWATCH - EMBEDDED short film!
wildcardWATCH - YARDSALE short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE AUDITION short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE ADDICT short film!
wildcardWATCH - 48 short film!
wildcardWATCH - DIM SUM OF ITS PARTS short film!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIE PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of film!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 SEX PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of sex pages online!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 FUNNY VIDEOS on the NET!
WATCH the best in HISTORY!
NAKED SCENESWATCH the TOP 100 SEX VIDEOS on the NET!
SEE the best of sex online!!
WATCH MOVIESWATCH TOP 100 MOVIES Today
Best of NEW films on the NET!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIES of ALL-TIME
See the best of film!
DIRECTORTOP 100 DIRECTORS of ALL-TIME
SEE THE LIST. Reviews, Photos and Scenes!
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCRIPTS
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!

The Godfather Part III,  MOVIE POSTERTHE GODFATHER Part III, 1990
Movie Reviews

Directed by Francis Ford Coppola
Starring: Al Pacino; Diane Keaton; Andy Garcia; Talia Shire; Sofia Coppola; George Hamilton; Bridget Fonda; Joe Mantegna; Eli Wallach;
Review by Tom Coatsworth


SYNOPSIS:

7 Oscar Nominations: Best Picture; best director; best editing, best supporting actor; best original song; best art direction, decor; best cinematography

New York, 1979 -- Michael Corleone has gone legit and wants to reconnect with his children, Mary and Tony, and his ex-wife Kay; but the dark forces he once marshaled have come back to haunt him and his dreams for a normal life.

CLICK HERE and watch 2009 MOVIES FOR FREE!

What is WILDsound?

REVIEW:

A great many talented, well meaning people came together to make this. Academy members gave it a stack of nominations. Still you wonder what they were drinking and where can you buy a bottle. Because if Godfather I and Godfather II seem like Michael and Sonny – Godfather III is Fredo. For Coppola and Puzo this is pretty weak stuff. Pretty: lush settings and cinematography flattering stars at every turn. Weak: a painfully, bloated and lackluster script.

Michael has been living in New York for some time. He has left the Mafia and become an investor/ philanthropist. He’s giving the Catholic Church a hundred million and they in turn are giving him the Order of St. Sebastian – he wants his children and Kay to be there. The reception after the ceremony is the grand party that opens all Godfather films – a lovely device to introduce main characters.

Amongst the small village of characters we encounter, Vincent (Garcia) – Sonny’s son, who arrives without invitation, bullies his way through the door and proceeds to chew a man’s ear off – not entirely mind you – he’s not Mike Tyson. And maybe that’s all Michael needs to know before he makes him the next godfather.

The rough template for the story is King Lear – a fine place to start: an ageing monarch relinquishes control of his kingdom to his heirs – but age has dimmed his judgment and he puts his trust in the wrong people: civil war erupts and tragedy ensues.

Michael stands in for Lear; and Vincent is definitely the wrong man to put your trust in. The Michael we remember from I and II would have destroyed this putz. Vincent is a sexy, swaggering, loose cannon; a dangerous man you wouldn’t trust with a grocery list. Still Michael indulges him at every turn. Vincent starts romancing Mary, his own cousin -- Michael’s daughter. Michael of old would have capped him. But this is not our Michael – this new Michael is a pushover and he weakens the script.

Part of the difficulty is that he needs redemption – for his past sins, for killing his brother. This is understandable and compelling; but it’s not a theme that wants a three ring circus for a plot. It could have been a much smaller and more successful film – just as Fredo might have led a fruitful life as a barkeep, instead of his disastrous turn as a Mafioso. Like Fredo, this film feels the need to live up to its illustrious heritage; and so...

There is a big money deal with the Church and his old Mafia Gang want in and Michael wimps out and lets them in and then there are tensions and rivalries and he has a heart attack and while he is unconscious Vincent orders a couple hits and all hell breaks loose and Michael wakes to mayhem. Redemption doesn’t stand a chance.

On the plus side there is Diane Keaton as Kay. Kay’s finally given the opportunity to be more than Michael’s reluctant pawn – she is torn between love and honor. Hers is one of the few, fully formed characters in the film. Carmine Coppola makes a fine contribution to the score -- on this film and the previous two. George Hamilton as Michael’s executive assistant is a pleasure to have around. And Sofia Coppola (Mary) lends a fresh face to these tired proceedings; although she’s a finer filmmaker today than actress 20 years ago, you wonder what anyone could bring to some of these lines:

The final setting in Palermo: an Opera House; all the major players are there. Michael is pulled aside and told of a plot to assassinate the Pope: Michael: “This Pope has powerful enemies – there may not be time to save him – let’s go back to the opera.”

This line owes less to Bill Shakespeare than to Groucho Marx.

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
MOVIE KILLSEE 1000s of PICTURES
Best of photos, images and pics
MOVIE YEARMOVIES YEAR BY YEAR
Pages from 1900 to present


The Godfather Part III


footer for The Godfather Part III page