Home
NEW TODAY
SCRIPT CONTESTS
FREE EVENTS
WATCH MOVIES
NEW MOVIES
FESTIVAL VIDEOS
PICTURES
READ POETRY
MOVIE SCENES
SUBMIT your FILM
POETRY CONTEST
DAILY PODCASTS
WATCH FREE FILMS
THE LAST RITE
2010 MOVIES
ACTORS
ACTRESSES
DIRECTORS
MOVIES by YEAR
FILM FRANCHISES
MOVIE GENRES
NOTES and IDEAS
WATCH VIRAL
GET OUR E-ZINE!
CONTACT US
TOP 100 Sex
FAQ
2011 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

THE DARK CRYSTAL, 1982
Movie Review

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
TOP 100TOP 100 LISTS WEBSITE
Best of photos, movies, sex and everything else!
movie trailersMOVIE TRAILERS
SEE the UPCOMING films. Plus reviews!
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!

WATCH today's TOP SHORT FILMS
EXPLORE and WATCH the TOP PAGES on THE NET!!
wildcardWATCH the best of WILDCARD PICTURES!
wildcardWATCH - BEAUTIFUL short film!
wildcardWATCH - NOSTALGIA short film!
wildcardWATCH - EMBEDDED short film!
wildcardWATCH - YARDSALE short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE AUDITION short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE ADDICT short film!
wildcardWATCH - 48 short film!
wildcardWATCH - DIM SUM OF ITS PARTS short film!
wildcardWATCH - START TO FINISH classic 8min. short film!
wildcardLISTEN TO DAILY ENTERTAINMENT PODCASTS!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIE PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of film!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 SEX PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of sex pages online!
NAKED SCENESWATCH the TOP 100 SEX VIDEOS on the NET!
SEE the best of sex online!!
WATCH MOVIESWATCH Today's MOVIES
Best of NEW films on the NET!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIES of ALL-TIME
See the best of film!
DIRECTORTOP 100 DIRECTORS of ALL-TIME
SEE THE LIST. Reviews, Photos and Scenes!
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCRIPTS
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!

THE DARK CRYSTAL MOVIE POSTER
THE DARK CRYSTAL, 1986
Movie Reviews

Directed by Jim Henson, Frank Oz
Starring: Kathryn Mullen, Jim Henson, Frank Oz, Dave Goelz, Steve Whitmore
Review by Jane Hopkins



SYNOPSIS:

On another planet in the distant past, a Gelfling embarks on a quest to find the missing shard of a magical crystal, and so restore order to his world.

CLICK HERE and watch 2009 MOVIES FOR FREE!

REVIEW:

Jim Henson’s “The Dark Crystal” is truly one-of-a-kind, so much so that even twenty-seven years later, there hasn’t been anything else like it. Featuring an all-puppet cast, it draws us into a complex world of cruelty and goodness, and shows us the struggle between those two forces.

The prologue tells of an ancient race which drew its power from a magic crystal, but whose squabbling caused that crystal to crack. As a result, this once peaceful species split into two different races: the corrupt Skeksis and the kindly Mystics. The rest of the story takes place a thousand years later, when both races have all but died out. In an effort to right the wrong, the wisest Mystic sends out his adopted son Jen, himself the supposed last survivor of the Gelfling species, on a quest to heal the crystal. On the way, Jen learns the history of the schism, the reasons behind the Gelfling genocide, and finds that he is not as alone as he once believed.

“The Dark Crystal” is a visual marvel, offering us a seemingly endless parade of imaginative creatures and landscapes. Interestingly, the character designs (provided by Brian Froud, who later worked on “Labyrinth”) veer more toward the ugly than the beautiful. Yet somehow, the grotesqueness of the cast makes for a more interesting viewing experience. Bizarre critters like the Podlings are still charming in their way, and the insect-like Garthim are as fascinating as they are frightening. Even the Skeksis, looking like vultures gone wrong, are somewhat sympathetic in their hideousness. It’s hard not to feel a bit sorry for such pathetic, decrepit characters. On the other end of the scale, the delicate Gelflings are the most humanlike of all the creatures, but they still have an otherworldly quality about them.

The performances in “The Dark Crystal” are a winning combination of expressive puppeteering, voice acting, and the occasional use of body doubles (the only humans to appear on-camera). It is difficult to separate the puppeteers from the voice actors, in cases where the puppeteer didn’t fulfill both roles. The puppeteering would not necessarily have succeeded without the voice acting, and vice versa. The body doubles used in the wide shots are likewise important, as the action scenes might have suffered from the puppets’ limitations. All these factors go into creating memorable characters, from the heroic Jen to the brutish leader of the Skeksis, and overall it reflects a remarkable level of cooperation.

For female fantasy enthusiasts, this film also has a fantasy heroine in Kira. Perhaps the only other Gelfling left in the world, Kira is a welcome change from certain genre clichés. After being inundated with ethereal princesses and tough-talking Amazons, it’s refreshing to see a fantasy heroine who combines the fragility of the former and the bravery of the latter without slipping into either extreme. Kira is also notable for her determination; in fact, she endures far more than Jen in the quest to restore the crystal.

Trailing always at Kira’s heels is another fantasy staple: the fuzzy animal sidekick, here called Fizzgig. However, perhaps because he does not speak, he never becomes irritating. He is actually one of the only creatures that could be classified as “cute,” and his loyalty is quite endearing. Other standout characters are the Chamberlain, a power-hungry Skeksis with a wonderfully expressive sneer, and the manic wise-woman Aughra.

A glorious score by Trevor Jones emphasizes the mythic quality of the story, adding some real majesty to the adventure. Of course, the music has its quieter moments: an impromptu duet between the Gelflings makes for a simple, serene moment in the midst of all the danger.

Another interesting aspect of this film is its ending. While most fantasy films would send their villains to oblivion, “The Dark Crystal” does things differently, further avoiding the clichés of the genre. Jen’s goal is not the destruction of the Skeksis; rather, it is their redemption. The scene in which the Skeksis and Mystics reunite is one of the most poignant moments in the film, when we realize that the “villains” were as in need of saving as the rest of their world. Everything builds to a beautiful, almost dreamlike finale that promises hope without tying things up too neatly.

It’s a shame more films haven’t followed in the footsteps of this one. “The Dark Crystal” is ambitious in its use of puppets to tell an epic tale, but due to the commitment of the filmmakers, the risk pays off. Through the creativity of its design and the enthusiasm of its performers, “The Dark Crystal” is a fantasy like no other.

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
MOVIE KILLSEE 1000s of PICTURES
Best of photos, images and pics
MOVIE YEARMOVIES YEAR BY YEAR
Pages from 1900 to present


The Dark Crystal


footer for The Dark Crystal page