HOME PAGE
Movie Videos
Films by Year
Films by Director
Films by Actor
Films by Actress
Films by Alphabet
Film Characters
Film Franchises

TOP 100 MOVIES in 2008!


2013 MOVIES
2012 MOVIES
2011 MOVIES
2010 MOVIES
2009 MOVIES
2008 MOVIES
2007 MOVIES
2006 MOVIES
2005 MOVIES
2004 MOVIES
2003 MOVIES
2002 MOVIES
2001 MOVIES
2000 MOVIES
1999 MOVIES
1998 MOVIES
1997 MOVIES
1996 MOVIES
1995 MOVIES
1994 MOVIES
1993 MOVIES
1992 MOVIES
1991 MOVIES
1990 MOVIES
1989 MOVIES
1988 MOVIES
1987 MOVIES
1986 MOVIES
1985 MOVIES
1984 MOVIES
1983 MOVIES
1982 MOVIES
1981 MOVIES
1980 MOVIES
1979 MOVIES
1978 MOVIES
1977 MOVIES
1976 MOVIES
1975 MOVIES
1974 MOVIES
1973 MOVIES
1972 MOVIES
1971 MOVIES
1970 MOVIES
1969 MOVIES
1968 MOVIES
1967 MOVIES
1966 MOVIES
1965 MOVIES
1964 MOVIES
1963 MOVIES
1962 MOVIES
1961 MOVIES
1960 MOVIES
1959 MOVIES
1958 MOVIES
1957 MOVIES
1956 MOVIES
1955 MOVIES
1954 MOVIES
1953 MOVIES
1952 MOVIES
1951 MOVIES
1950 MOVIES
1949 MOVIES
1948 MOVIES
1947 MOVIES
1946 MOVIES
1945 MOVIES
1944 MOVIES
1943 MOVIES
1942 MOVIES
1941 MOVIES
1940 MOVIES
1939 MOVIES
1938 MOVIES
1937 MOVIES
1936 MOVIES
1935 MOVIES
1934 MOVIES
1933 MOVIES
1932 MOVIES
1931 MOVIES
1930 MOVIES
1929 MOVIES
1928 MOVIES
1927 MOVIES
1926 MOVIES
1925 MOVIES
1924 MOVIES
1923 MOVIES
1922 MOVIES
1921 MOVIES
1920 MOVIES
1919 MOVIES
1918 MOVIES
1917 MOVIES
1916 MOVIES
1915 MOVIES
1914 MOVIES
1913 MOVIES
1912 MOVIES
1911 MOVIES
1910 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

THE CLASS, 2008
Movie Reviews!

Search 1,000 of MOVIES
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!
WATCH VIDEO MOVIE REVIEW:
2008 MOVIE BESTTOP 100 MOVIES from 2008


See the LIST
2008 MOVIE BEST2008 MOVIE BEST

See over 400 genres of films of 2008

 MOVIES by ALPHABET

See over 10,000 plus films!
 Every movie from 2008

See over 200 plus films!



THE CLASSTHE CLASS, 2008
Movie Review

Directed Laurent Cantet
Starring: François Bégaudeau
Review by John Corcoran



SYNOPSIS:

Teacher and novelist François Bégaudeau plays a version of himself as he negotiates a year with his racially mixed students from a tough Parisian neighborhood.

OSCAR NOMINEE for Best Foreign Language Film of the Year

CLICK HERE and Watch More Drama Movies for FREE!

REVIEW:

Most movies treat teachers as kinds of secular saints, endowing their students with life lessons that transcend the curriculum. From Goodbye, Mr. Chips to Dead Poets Society, films praise teachers for their noble efforts to educate our young, both shielding them from the dangers of the outside world and simultaneously providing them the tools with which to confront it. A cocktail of nostalgia and gratitude usually obscures the more complicated, more authentic reality that far from an escape from society at large, the classroom is a microcosm of it.

The Class is the story of one academic year in the lives of Mr. Marin (Francois Begaudeau) and his students at an urban Parisian school. The film is presented through the basic cycle of the school year beginning at the excitement of the first day and ending with the relief of summer vacation. The students are representative of the ethnic, cultural, and social diversity in Paris, ranging from Malian to Moroccan. This diversity severely complicates Mr. Marin’s attempts to teach French.

In The Class, director Laurent Cantet achieves a sense of authenticity. By casting Begaudeau, who wrote the semi-autobiographical novel upon which the film is based, as Mr. Marin and untrained actors using their real names as the students, Cantet creates a realness to the performances, which may have been otherwise impossible to elicit. Begaudeau knows from his own experience how teachers and students interact, and the students embody the energy and anxiety of early adolescence. Also, he films in a documentary-style to distract the audience from the fictional narrative. This provides an even-handedness to the concerns of both teacher and students. Finally, and most importantly, we see nothing outside the confines of the school. Occasionally, we are given hints at the lives of Mr. Marin or his students when school is out, but our focus remains firmly on the class as a social unit.

The classroom as social commentary is not without precedent, but most American films are only interested in examining status – those lunch hall cliques. Cantet presses broader questions about the complexities of living in a multicultural society. From the outset, the students and the teacher have different expectations. Mr. Marin expects his students want to learn so that they can better their lives.

The students expect to learn things that will be meaningful. Both expectations seem valid, and yet, as a debate over the imperfect subjunctive tense exhibits, there is a chasm between student and teacher that is exceedingly difficult to cross. Even the students themselves arrive at the class with different expectations – an African student is ashamed to eat in front of a fellow classmate’s mother because he respects her, an Asian student is ashamed of his classmates’ bad behavior. To add greater complexity, the students’ parents bring another independent set of expectations. Some appear interested interest in preparing their child for the next level of education, others just want to be assured that their child is staying out of trouble.

As in any class, though, power is not evenly distributed. The teacher is expected to maintain authority. How that authority is exercised is difficult in any environment, but even more so amongst such conflicting cultural norms. When a student is punished, he or she believes that they are being “singled out” or that Mr. Marin is “seeking revenge.” For a class that holds onto their ethnicities and refuses to call themselves French, Mr. Marin is a symbol for their new alien home, and the ambivalent feelings towards their teacher mirrors their view of France itself. Although some of the students’ rebelliousness is a product of normal adolescent behavior, the essential disparity in power means that classroom harmony is tenuous and can be disrupted at the slightest provocation. Not unlike the “real world.”

The Class was both highly praised, winning the Palme d’Or at Cannes, and highly controversial in France. But the issues underscored in the film have implications for all multicultural societies. The fundamental questions are those with which philosophers from Plato’s time have struggled. What are the ends of education? How do competing interests work towards the common good? What is the legitimate use of authority? What are the moral obligations of society to its youth? Cantet does not provide any easy answers in The Class. But how we answer them is the ultimate final exam.

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
MOVIE KILLSEE 1000s of PICTURES
Best of photos, images and pics
MOVIE YEARMOVIES YEAR BY YEAR
Pages from 1900 to present


The Class


footer for The Class page