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STEVEN PAPINEAU

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WILDsound 2010 Spring Feature Screenplay Finalist - STEVEN PAPINEAU

1. What is your screenplay about?

The Pharmacist is a story about Albert Dyeman, a financially struggling pharmacist in a small 1962 town who is battling the mysterious murder of his wife and daughter, heroin addiction, horrific hallucinations and FBI agent Dennis Dix, who believes Albert is a notorious and wanted outlaw.

2. Why did you decide to write this screenplay?

The script idea started when I worked for a sales company that placed orders for pharmacies across the U.S. and the question of how many of these pharmacists, surrounded by drugs all day, would be tempted to start using. This, of course, was just a basic outline. Once I started to write, the story went into many different directions that I never originally anticipated.

3. How long have you been writing screenplays?

I've been writing for about fifteen years now.

4. What is your favorite movie of all-time?

My favorite movie of all-time would have to be ALIEN. The story, the acting, the directing, the set design, the lighting, everything about it is pitch perfect.

5. What artist in the industry would you love to work with?

Quentin Tarantino hands down is the artsit I'd want to work with or just be able to watch at work. ...best storyteller in Hollywood.

6. Who was your hero growing up?

Clint Eastwood. No explaination needed.

7. Ideally, where would you like to be in 5 years?

Five years from now, whether I can sell a script or not, I'll still be in Sacramento, CA. It's home. But hopefully I won't be having to work 7am-4pm Mon-Fri and I'll have the time and resources to go out and see the world.

8. Describe your process; do you have a set routine, method for writing?

Every script is different as far as the writing process. Some I have mapped out, scene-by-scene and know exactly how it's going to end. Others, like the Pharmacist, are just an idea that develops over time and I have no idea how it'll end until I get there. One important thing for me is to write, at least, a page a day.

9. Apart from writing, what else are you passionate about?

Writing is my number one passion with filmmaking a distant second. I've written, produced and directed two feature length movies on Digital Video and being on a set, being creative and hanging out with creative people is fantastic, a lot of fun, but post-production, editing, marketing and being a salesman once the movie is finished is not a lot of fun, not fulfilling. Creatively... writing is where it's at.

10. What influenced you to enter the WILDsound Script Contest?

I entered WILDsound because it was the only script festival that gave feedback to everyone and the winner the opportunity to have their script acted out on stage. With most competitions it seems like you pay your $50 fee and three months later you get a letter saying "sorry... yada-yada-yada" with no feedback on the story. No thanks. I thrive on feedback, positive or negative.

11. Any advice or tips you’d like to pass on to other writers?

Advice to other writers... have a visually strong beginning. Put the reader in the middle of the atmosphere of the story. If you can capture the reader's imagination right out of the gate you're on to something. Other advice... even if you're not in the mood to write, take those little steps every day, whether it's just thinking about a script, or writing down notes or watching a movie that gets you energized; a tiny step every day will go a long way.



STEVEN PAPINEAU


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