Home
NEW TODAY
SCRIPT CONTESTS
FREE EVENTS
WATCH MOVIES
NEW MOVIES
FESTIVAL VIDEOS
PICTURES
READ POETRY
MOVIE SCENES
SUBMIT your FILM
POETRY CONTEST
DAILY PODCASTS
WATCH FREE FILMS
THE LAST RITE
2010 MOVIES
ACTORS
ACTRESSES
DIRECTORS
MOVIES by YEAR
FILM FRANCHISES
MOVIE GENRES
NOTES and IDEAS
WATCH VIRAL
GET OUR E-ZINE!
CONTACT US
TOP 100 Sex
FAQ
2011 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

SERPICO, 1973
Movie Review

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
TOP 100TOP 100 LISTS WEBSITE
Best of photos, movies, sex and everything else!
movie trailersMOVIE TRAILERS
SEE the UPCOMING films. Plus reviews!
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!

WATCH today's TOP SHORT FILMS
EXPLORE and WATCH the TOP PAGES on THE NET!!
wildcardWATCH the best of WILDCARD PICTURES!
wildcardWATCH - BEAUTIFUL short film!
wildcardWATCH - NOSTALGIA short film!
wildcardWATCH - EMBEDDED short film!
wildcardWATCH - YARDSALE short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE AUDITION short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE ADDICT short film!
wildcardWATCH - 48 short film!
wildcardWATCH - DIM SUM OF ITS PARTS short film!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIE PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of film!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 SEX PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of sex pages online!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 FUNNY VIDEOS on the NET!
WATCH the best in HISTORY!
NAKED SCENESWATCH the TOP 100 SEX VIDEOS on the NET!
SEE the best of sex online!!
WATCH MOVIESWATCH TOP 100 MOVIES Today
Best of NEW films on the NET!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIES of ALL-TIME
See the best of film!
DIRECTORTOP 100 DIRECTORS of ALL-TIME
SEE THE LIST. Reviews, Photos and Scenes!
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCRIPTS
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!

SERPICO,   MOVIE POSTERSERPICO, 1973
Movie Reviews

Directed by Sidney Lumet
Starring: Al Pacino, John Randolph, Jack Kehoe, Biff McGuire, Barbara Eda-Young, Cornelia Sharpe, Allan Rich
Review by Surinder Singh


SYNOPSIS:

New York cop Frank Serpico fights a one-man war against the corruption thriving within the New York Police Department. The battle against corruption isolates Serpico from his fellow officers and puts his life under threat, as he must now fear the bullets of criminals and cops.

CLICK HERE and watch 2009 MOVIES FOR FREE!

What is WILDsound?

REVIEW:

Al Pacino is one of those rare Hollywood leading men that have created more than one cult icon in their career. Along with Michael Corleone and Tony Montana there’s another face that dominates the bedroom wall of young men… Serpico. Like Che Guevara, Serpico is synonymous with being a man fighting against the establishment – perfect cult icon material! Also like Che Guevara, some were even not entirely aware of what Serpico was fighting for or had even seen the movie. Yet on the strength of Pacino’s image and sheer presence, young men wanted to identify with him regardless. Pacino actually changes Serpico’s image frequently throughout the movie but it’s the image of Serpico in hippy-style clothing with that bushy beard and wispy hair that cemented Serpico’s cult icon status.

Sidney Lumet’s direction is characteristically non-showy throughout, retaining that gritty cop thriller realism that worked so well for films like: The French Connection (1971) and Dirty Harry (1971). But whereas films like these opted for leading men with towering presence (Clint Eastwood) and rock hard gravitas (Gene Hackman), Lumet opted for the diminutive, less conventional cop with Pacino. Pacino had proved himself to be believable as the Mafia boss sat behind a desk pulling strings with an iron fist in The Godfather (1972). But as the street-level law enforcer Frank Serpico, Pacino was treading new ground. This time he wasn’t playing the guy at the top of the criminal food chain, rather the foot soldier on the ground floor that’s trying to fight the guys pulling the strings at the top.

From the word go we see that Frank Serpico is a man who will not be corrupted. When he’s offered a free shot at a young black man under interrogation he coldly declines. Very quickly we identify Serpico as the outsider, an outsider who has won our allegiance. Like Frank we’re disgusted with the state of play in this police department and very soon we know he’ll make a stand. On the other hand we are shown that Frank is also an outsider in his personal life. He doesn’t have time to meet the Italian American girl Marianne his parents are trying to fix him up with and would rather date Leslie (Cornelia Sharpe) a girl outside his community.

Very soon Frank is offered his first slice of the pay-off. Naturally he refuses the money and this alienates him further from his colleagues. Taking as given is not something he’s keen to do and Serpico is a name that becomes famous among those who are grateful for this extra “bonus”. In Serpico there are very few cops that seem to be sympathetic to his cause. While he makes a few buddies like Bob (Tony Roberts) he always seems to get let down in his campaign and is forced to transfer out of his department. But with his performance Pacino shows us that it’s more than this.

Although Serpico’s intentions are very honorable, it’s his personality that also seems to do him no favors. Pacino plays Serpico with quite a number of dimensions to make him more real. His honesty is without exception but at times he comes across as arrogant, sarcastic and ever so slightly self righteous. Pacino enters his new department holding a white mouse and when asked about it his response is in a very sarcastic tone: “Oh you heard about it?” Pacino shows us an honest cop who has a taste for being unconventional. Perhaps he’s an outsider by choice? Perhaps he just wants to stand out for the sake of defiance? Pacino lets us judge for ourselves.

So while we appreciate this uncompromising attitude of Serpico we can also see him going out of his way to isolate himself from others. We don’t want him to get hurt but we feel that he might if he doesn’t watch himself. This is reflected in the way Pacino handles Serpico’s relationship with women. As his quest intensifies his personal relationships deteriorate, he becomes short tempered: “When I come home, I want to come home to a clean house.” And really starts to be only concerned with his own affairs. As the film progresses Pacino portrays a man increasingly isolated from the people around him.

The scene that really shows this is where Serpico is faced with a fellow officer who is armed with a knife and is trying to intimidate him. Serpico sees the knife and takes no chances because by this point it’s perfectly likely the officer might use it! Serpico throws him down and pulls a gun he bought specifically for defending himself against cops: “That gun takes a 14 shot clip. You expecting an army?” Pacino sinks his teeth into the physical side of being a police officer and shows what it might really be like to chase down criminals and take them in. The action is far less glamorous than in previous cop thrillers and yet it still was considered “movie cool”.

Serpico’s cult status has in some way perhaps transcended the film’s subject. Like with The Crow (1994) people celebrate the image of Brandon Lee in popular culture separately from the film itself. Serpico is similar in this regard, perhaps it’s Pacino that’s celebrated before the idea of fighting corruption in establishment? Would the same film be as much of a cult favorite with another actor playing the same part? It’s often said that films live and die on their casting… Serpico lives because of Pacino!

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
MOVIE KILLSEE 1000s of PICTURES
Best of photos, images and pics
MOVIE YEARMOVIES YEAR BY YEAR
Pages from 1900 to present


SERPICO


footer for Serpico page