Home
NEW TODAY
SCRIPT CONTESTS
FREE EVENTS
WATCH MOVIES
NEW MOVIES
FESTIVAL VIDEOS
PICTURES
READ POETRY
MOVIE SCENES
SUBMIT your FILM
POETRY CONTEST
DAILY PODCASTS
WATCH FREE FILMS
THE LAST RITE
2010 MOVIES
ACTORS
ACTRESSES
DIRECTORS
MOVIES by YEAR
FILM FRANCHISES
MOVIE GENRES
NOTES and IDEAS
WATCH VIRAL
GET OUR E-ZINE!
CONTACT US
TOP 100 Sex
FAQ
2011 MOVIES

Subscribe To This Site
XML RSS
Add to Google
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines
 

JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH, 1996
Movie Review

SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCREENPLAY
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!
NEW MOVIE REVIEWSNEW MOVIE REVIEWS
Read Today's POSTED REVIEWS
TOP 100TOP 100 LISTS WEBSITE
Best of photos, movies, sex and everything else!
movie trailersMOVIE TRAILERS
SEE the UPCOMING films. Plus reviews!
CLICK and WATCH MOVIES ONLINE!

SEE AND WATCH BEST of NATALIE PORTMAN

WATCH today's TOP SHORT FILMS
EXPLORE and WATCH the TOP PAGES on THE NET!!
wildcardWATCH the best of WILDCARD PICTURES!
wildcardWATCH - BEAUTIFUL short film!
wildcardWATCH - NOSTALGIA short film!
wildcardWATCH - EMBEDDED short film!
wildcardWATCH - YARDSALE short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE AUDITION short film!
wildcardWATCH - THE ADDICT short film!
wildcardWATCH - 48 short film!
wildcardWATCH - DIM SUM OF ITS PARTS short film!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIE PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of film!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 SEX PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of sex pages online!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 FUNNY VIDEOS on the NET!
WATCH the best in HISTORY!
NAKED SCENESWATCH the TOP 100 SEX VIDEOS on the NET!
SEE the best of sex online!!
WATCH MOVIESWATCH TOP 100 MOVIES Today
Best of NEW films on the NET!
TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIES of ALL-TIME
See the best of film!
DIRECTORTOP 100 DIRECTORS of ALL-TIME
SEE THE LIST. Reviews, Photos and Scenes!
SCREENPLAY CONTESTSUBMIT your SCRIPTS
Voted #1 screenplay contest in the world!

JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH POSTERJAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH, 1996
Movie Reviews

Directed by Henry Selick

Cast: Simon Callow, Richard Dreyfuss, Jane Leeves, Susan Sarandon, Pete Postlethwaite, Miriam Margolyes
Review by Jane Hopkins


SYNOPSIS:

James' happy life at the English seaside is rudely ended when his parents are killed by a rhinoceros and he goes to live with his two horrid aunts. Daringly saving the life of a spider he comes into possession of magic boiled crocodile tongues, after which an enormous peach starts to grow in the garden. Venturing inside he meets not only the spider but a number of new friends including a ladybug and a centipede who help him with his plan to try and get to New York.

CLICK HERE and watch TV SHOWS FOR FREE!

What is WILDsound?

REVIEW:

We lost a brilliantly twisted mind when we lost Roald Dahl, whose so-called children’s books have entertained and disturbed kids for decades. Dahl’s works have inspired several film adaptations, all of which have tried to emulate the author’s unique balance of whimsy and unadulterated horror. In adapting “James and the Giant Peach” to film, screenwriters Karey Kirkpatrick, Jonathan Roberts, and Steve Bloom succeed in capturing the spirit of Dahl’s dark imagination while adding creative new touches.

When a rhinoceros devours his parents before his very eyes, James Henry Trotter is forced to live in the “care” of his aunts Spiker and Sponge. As cruel as they are hideous, these hags make James’ life a misery. One day, the boy meets a strange old man who offers him a bag full of enchanted crocodile tongues (but of course), promising that they will change James’ life. Unfortunately, James spills the bag, and all the magic meant for him wriggles into the roots of a barren peach-tree. When the tree produces a peach the size of a house, the aunts see an opportunity to make some money. It seems James’ dreams have gone up in smoke, but one night, he makes an incredible discovery. Crawling through a tunnel in the side of the peach, the boy finds himself face-to-face with a group of giant talking bugs. With his newfound friends, James intends to travel to New York City, a place his parents had dreamed of visiting.

If all this sounds weird, it is, but it’s also highly enjoyable. Director Henry Selick (“The Nightmare Before Christmas,” “Coraline”) brings Roald Dahl’s novel to life with humour and creativity. The story is told through both live action and stop-motion animation, creating a clear division between James’ life before and after the introduction of magic. The film begins with an idyllic, hyper-real version of the perfect childhood, but then degenerates into a cold vision of James’ life with his aunts. Things are already strange before we get to the stop-motion portion of the film, but when James finally makes his journey to the center of the peach, that’s when Selick kicks it up a notch. Get ready for spider-web lassoes, undead pirates, and a steampunk shark.

And musical numbers.

Child actors are notoriously hit-and-miss, but Paul Terry is a winner as James. Whether playing the part live or lending his voice to the stop-motion version of the character, Terry exudes honesty and inner strength. As James’ aunts, seasoned comedic actresses Joanna Lumley and Miriam Margoyles are terrific. Lumley, usually so elegant, is especially unsettling as Spiker. Thanks to the make-up department, here she looks a little like someone’s unearthed a corpse, dusted off the soil and slapped a wig on it. Pete Postlethwaite has a cameo as the old man, and delivers several of the most meaningful lines in the movie.

The bugs have all been perfectly cast. Simon Callow makes a distinguished Old Green Grasshopper, who clashes with the loud-mouthed Mr. Centipede, played by Richard Dreyfuss. Susan Sarandon affects a sultry Russian accent as Miss Spider, while Jane Leeves plays the maternal Mrs. Ladybug. Rounding out the cast are David Thewlis as the visually-impaired Mr. Earthworm – complete with dark sunglasses – and the ditzy Miss Glowworm (voiced by Aunt Sponge herself, Miriam Margoyles). It isn’t long before we really care about these characters, keeping in mind that in real life, the concept of a six-foot centipede just doesn’t bear thinking about.

The songs by Randy Newman are catchy, and one, “Eating the Peach,” features lyrics lifted straight out of Dahl’s novel.

“James and the Giant Peach” is an underrated movie, having never attained the cult status of “The Nightmare Before Christmas” (on that note, watch out for a certain “skellington” in the pirate ship sequence). Looking back on it now, it’s a worthy tribute to Roald Dahl’s bizarre imagination, and a charming family film in its own right. With an adventurous spirit and beautiful animation, it’s proof that when a good story meets talent and creativity, “marvellous things will happen.”

TOP 100 MOVIESTOP 100 MOVIE PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of film!
SEXY PHOTOSSEXY PHOTOS TOP 100
Sexiest people on the planet!
TOP 100 SEXTOP 100 SEX PAGES
WATCH and SEE the best of sex pages online
NAKED SCENESWATCH the TOP 100 NUDE SCENES of all-time
SEE the best of naked film!


JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH


footer for JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH page